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O*NET® Products at Work

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration introduced the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) to the public in 1998. Since that time, its impact on workforce development, career counseling, educational programming and human resource activities has quickly expanded, both in the U.S. and around the world. O*NET Products at Work provides examples of the widespread use of O*NET OnLine, the O*NET database, the Toolkit for Business, and the O*NET Career Exploration Tools.

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Download a list of books, research papers, and websites referencing O*NET products and tools:

O*NET Reference List (XLSX - 118 KB)

Sample Stories:

Trustmark Insurance Company external site

Trustmark Insurance Company uses O*NET OnLine to collect information on job titles, tasks, skills, and to access salary data. Human resources personnel use this information to describe tasks associated with sales support activities and to align managers’ job titles with appropriate occupations across industries. O*NET occupational descriptions and data help to determine appropriate salary ranges for company positions and provide validation of company salary survey data.

Chattahoochee Valley Community College external site

Chattahoochee Valley Community College, in Phenix City, Alabama, used O*NET OnLine to help a non-traditional student qualify for financial aid. The student was ex-military and was required to document that completing Chattahoochee Valley’s program in Homeland Security would result in his being prepared to secure employment. Using the keywords, Homeland Security, resulted in a long list of related careers with common skills, tasks, and work context elements. The student was able to print out these elements of the database and show that the program at Chattahoochee Valley Community College addressed those requirements.

Detailed Work Activity (DWA) Common Language Project external site from Texas Workforce Commission external site

The Texas Workforce Commission has developed the Detailed Work Activity (DWA) Common Language Project. The O*NET DWA library was the point of departure for the Texas common language initiative. A white paper that documents the underlying philosophies of the project can be found on the site. The document describes the various skills databases that have been developed, the talent management context within which this initiative was originated, and the many potential applications for the DWA data sets. It is written to describe the administrative processes thus far undertaken in Texas to bring a universal skill transferability system to fruition, and to stimulate further thinking about the role of skills in assessing the relationship between worker capabilities and employer hiring requirements.

ACLMIS' Dislocated Worker System external site

Alabama’s ACLMIS' Dislocated Worker System is a Web-based system providing assistance to individuals who have lost their jobs due to permanent layoffs or plant closings. Its skill survey questionnaire is based on O*NET data (abilities, knowledges, skills, and work activities). The system uses the O*NET occupational classification system for easy linkage to Alabama's labor market information. The ACLMIS System allows users to research occupations, analyze their skills to find suitable occupations, or find occupations similar to their current occupation.

The Workforce Investment Board of Southwest Missouri external site

The Workforce Investment Board of Southwest Missouri was called on to provide data to attract a germanium wafer (a solar cell semiconductor component) manufacturer to Quapaw, Oklahoma. Oklahoma is part of a four-state WIRED region, so workforce data on all four states was analyzed, using EMSI’s labor market tool, Strategic Advantage. Strategic Advantage uses O*NET data to define the knowledges, skills, and abilities available to employers in a region. With this data, the WIB was able to clearly demonstrate the skills and availability of workers in the area. The manufacturer was convinced that the small town of Quapaw had the necessary workforce, resulting in a $51 million investment and 250 new jobs.

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