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O*NET® Products at Work

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration introduced the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) to the public in 1998. Since that time, its impact on workforce development, career counseling, educational programming and human resource activities has quickly expanded, both in the U.S. and around the world. O*NET Products at Work provides examples of the widespread use of O*NET OnLine, the O*NET database, the Toolkit for Business, and the O*NET Career Exploration Tools.

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Download a list of books, research papers, and websites referencing O*NET products and tools:

O*NET Reference List (XLSX - 118 KB)

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Piedmont Natural Gas external site

Piedmont Natural Gas has used O*NET tools to help reduce turnover among entry-level employees. It has used O*NET Career Exploration Tools and occupational data to create a formal system to better match entry-level job applicants’ talents, abilities, and preferences with the duties and working conditions of the jobs for which they are applying. Part of the project included conducting a job analysis on each job family. In addition to employee surveys, interviews, focus groups, observations, and job-specific training materials. Detailed Reports from the O*NET OnLine Web site provided information about the necessary knowledges, skills, and abilities for the targeted positions.

IHaveAPlanIowa external site

IHaveAPlanIowa provides users a planning sequence to help them identify training needs related to career aspirations and local education resources to meet those requirements. Flexible tools help users create resumes and portfolios to organize credentials, experiences, and goals. Users can conduct job searches by exploring local and state job markets. Integrated with the system are professional tools for support staff to allow for review of client portfolios and generation of reports. The online tool relies on both the O*NET database and O*NET Career Exploration Tools.

LifeWorks external site from National Institutes of Health’s Office of Science Education external site

Health and medical science career exploration with LifeWorks™ is accomplished through an interactive career development Web site operated by the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Science Education. Driven by O*NET data, the LifeWorks search engine, or Career Finder, offers an array of information on more than 100 health and medical science careers. Staff designed the Web site for middle school and high school students, parents, mentors, teachers, and guidance counselors. As a first step, students scan a list of O*NET Job Families and select the ones that most interest them. Second, they identify the kinds of jobs that suit their interests, using the O*NET interest categories. Third, they select skills they have or want to acquire. The Career Finder then generates a customized list of health-related careers, with brief descriptions, matching the students’ selections. By clicking on a title, students can view job-specific information on the summary page. If they like, they can access details about the occupation, including employment outlook, salary, suggested high school courses, related careers, and more.

Career Transitions external site from Cengage Learning external site

Cengage Learning has developed a product called Career Transitions that uses the O*NET Interest Profiler and the O*NET database to help job seekers. Their web site states that career research is the number one use of public libraries today, sometimes stretching staff to their limits. Career Transitions helps public libraries manage the number of people seeking job search help by providing a self-paced application that walks job seekers through the entire process from assessing strengths and interests, to exploring new job opportunities.

GetMyFuture external site from CareerOneStop external site

CareerOneStop, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, has launched the mobile-friendly portal GetMyFuture. The site incorporates the O*NET Mini Interest Profiler and O*NET occupation data to assist users in finding careers they like, as well as entry-level jobs that match their interests. The portal also provides a comprehensive set of resources for job training, job searches, job application and resume preparation, and tutorials to prepare job seekers for interviewing and beginning work in their new jobs.

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