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O*NET® Products at Work

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration introduced the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) to the public in 1998. Since that time, its impact on workforce development, career counseling, educational programming and human resource activities has quickly expanded, both in the U.S. and around the world. O*NET Products at Work provides examples of the widespread use of O*NET OnLine, the O*NET database, the Toolkit for Business, and the O*NET Career Exploration Tools.

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Download a list of books, research papers, and websites referencing O*NET products and tools:

O*NET Reference List (XLSX - 118 KB)

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The Mentor external site from Penn State Division of Undergraduate Studies external site

In its academic advising journal, The Mentor, the Pennsylvania State University Division of Undergraduate Studies describes O*NET OnLine as a valuable academic advising tool. It explains use of the Occupation Quick Search to find occupations related to specific academic disciplines. For example, a student or advisor can type in “psychology major” to return a list of occupations rank-ordered by relevance to that discipline. Use of O*NET OnLine is also applied to the Bates “Ask Questions” activity, in which students are asked questions about their favorite and least-favorite classes, favorite pastimes, and length of time they are willing to go to school. Responses to these questions provide the basis for O*NET OnLine searches, which can produce occupation results based on students’ course preferences, education-level preferences, personal styles, or values.

Harvard Business School external site

Harvard Business School students conducted a study (Hanna, 2008), to assess the potential for the offshoring of more than 800 occupations in the U.S. economy. The O*NET database served as the source of occupational information for the study on descriptors such as tasks, knowledges, and skills. The student researchers considered the information in the O*NET database and then rated occupations on a scale of 1 to 100 depending on whether the occupations’ tasks could easily be performed offshore. The students estimated that between 21 and 42 percent of all U.S. jobs are potentially offshorable.

Iowa Data Dissemination Bureau external site

The Iowa Data Dissemination Bureau provides occupational publications and web reports for employers, job seekers, educators, and economic developers. The publications cover data such as the fastest growing jobs by educational achievement level, the top skill sets, high demand and high wage occupations, and education/training requirements. O*NET occupational skills data, by level of importance and education and training requirements, are used for these projects.

Occupational Transferability Analyzer (OTA) from The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development external site

The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development created the Occupational Transferability Analyzer (OTA) using O*NET knowledge, skills, and abilities data. The OTA computes a single transferability score that allows users to consider the feasibility of moving from one occupation to another. The score ranges from -100 to +100 and provides a measure of the comparability between two different occupations based on knowledge, skill, and ability levels.

MI Advantage from Human eSources

MI Advantage™ from Human eSources reveals career options based on students’ multiple intelligences profiles. Students can research occupations and college majors then save notes and rate careers in their portfolio using the O*NET Database. The 15-minute assessment and report are written and normalized for students from 8th grade to college.

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