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O*NET® Products at Work

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration introduced the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) to the public in 1998. Since that time, its impact on workforce development, career counseling, educational programming and human resource activities has quickly expanded, both in the U.S. and around the world. O*NET Products at Work provides examples of the widespread use of O*NET OnLine, the O*NET database, the Toolkit for Business, and the O*NET Career Exploration Tools.

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Download a list of books, research papers, and websites referencing O*NET products and tools:

O*NET Reference List (XLSX - 118 KB)

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Trustmark Insurance Company external site

Trustmark Insurance Company uses O*NET OnLine to collect information on job titles, tasks, skills, and to access salary data. Human resources personnel use this information to describe tasks associated with sales support activities and to align managers’ job titles with appropriate occupations across industries. O*NET occupational descriptions and data help to determine appropriate salary ranges for company positions and provide validation of company salary survey data.

Northern California Regional Competitiveness Network (NCRCN) external site

The Northern California Regional Competitiveness Network (NCRCN) analyzed data from U.S. Census Bureau nonemployer statistics for the Northern California WIRED Cluster study. This self-employment study identified occupations within clusters with career potential, high-mid-entry level wages, and small size occupations. Science, technology, mathematics, and engineering (STEM) occupations were of particular interest. A focus was placed on occupations that offer workers the opportunity for upward mobility and lateral transfer among industries. The study used O*NET data concerning key characteristics of each occupation, including the description, wages, educational requirements, skills, knowledges, abilities, and work activities. The study provided a data-driven foundation for the economic and workforce development programs of the Northern California WIRED project and focused talent development on occupations that show job and wage growth.

Workforce Central Florida external site

The Workforce Central Florida online tool provides employers assistance with their recruitment, retention, and training needs. Employers can post job opportunities and search the resume job bank. The Web site provides access to numerous human resources topics, articles, and other resources. Job seekers can post resumes, search the job bank, and keep abreast of career-related seminars, articles, and services. The Web site provides links to O*NET data and O*NET-based career tools.

The Mentor external site from Penn State Division of Undergraduate Studies external site

In its academic advising journal, The Mentor, the Pennsylvania State University Division of Undergraduate Studies describes O*NET OnLine as a valuable academic advising tool. It explains use of the Occupation Quick Search to find occupations related to specific academic disciplines. For example, a student or advisor can type in “psychology major” to return a list of occupations rank-ordered by relevance to that discipline. Use of O*NET OnLine is also applied to the Bates “Ask Questions” activity, in which students are asked questions about their favorite and least-favorite classes, favorite pastimes, and length of time they are willing to go to school. Responses to these questions provide the basis for O*NET OnLine searches, which can produce occupation results based on students’ course preferences, education-level preferences, personal styles, or values.

Profile of the Health Care Industry from Kansas Department of Labor external site

The Kansas Department of Labor used O*NET skills, knowledges, and abilities as a tool in their research for the report, Profile of the Health Care Industry. The report profiles the three health care industry sub-sectors and the occupations within these industries. The goal of the research was to assist workforce development planners and policy makers in decisions aimed at achieving desired turnover and retention rates and to develop necessary training programs.

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