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O*NET® Products at Work

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration introduced the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) to the public in 1998. Since that time, its impact on workforce development, career counseling, educational programming and human resource activities has quickly expanded, both in the U.S. and around the world. O*NET Products at Work provides examples of the widespread use of O*NET OnLine, the O*NET database, the Toolkit for Business, and the O*NET Career Exploration Tools.

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Journal article [X]

Career guidance in India based on O*NET and cultural variables external site from Tucareers.com external site

A career intervention was conceived based on O*NET for use in India. The intervention orientated career decision makers based on the O*NET’s taxonomy and navigated them to suitable careers based on a multi trait assessment based on the worker characteristics data in O*NET database. In an empirical evaluation with post-graduate management students effectiveness of the career intervention in reducing career decision-making difficulties was presented. Cultural variables were also explored which offered insights on O*NET's usage in a different culture.

Using the Department of Labor's My Next Move to Improve Career Preparedness external site from Journal of Management Education, Vol. 41 external site

This research uses a pretest/post test design with a treatment group and a control group to determine if an exercise based on My Next Move improves career preparedness. Results show that the exercise produces significant increases in career awareness and in perceived career preparedness skills. The positive results indicate that this tool can help students be more knowledgeable about their career options after graduation. This paper can help instructors use the My Next Move exercise to help students in their job search process.

The Mentor external site from Penn State Division of Undergraduate Studies external site

In its academic advising journal, The Mentor, the Pennsylvania State University Division of Undergraduate Studies describes O*NET OnLine as a valuable academic advising tool. It explains use of the Occupation Quick Search to find occupations related to specific academic disciplines. For example, a student or advisor can type in “psychology major” to return a list of occupations rank-ordered by relevance to that discipline. Use of O*NET OnLine is also applied to the Bates “Ask Questions” activity, in which students are asked questions about their favorite and least-favorite classes, favorite pastimes, and length of time they are willing to go to school. Responses to these questions provide the basis for O*NET OnLine searches, which can produce occupation results based on students’ course preferences, education-level preferences, personal styles, or values.